1639

Manatvs gelegen op de Noot [sic] Riuier.
Vinckeboons, Joan. 1639. Digital version from the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division

This ink and watercolor map shows the early fort and the primary buildings of Manhattan, with a key to the householders. Also shows the surrounding area.

1660

The Castello Plan
Cortelyou, Jacques. 1660. Digital scan via Wikimedia Commons.

An early plan depicting individual buildings. A digital redraft has been created by Peter Ekamper

1664

The Duke's Plan
Holmes, Robert. 1664. Possibly a copy from Cortelyou's plan above. Digital scan via the British Library Online Gallery.

A colorful map presented to James Duke of York on the occasion of the city's capture and renaming by the English

1673

Nieu Amsterdam at New Yorck
Allard, Carol, Engraver. c.1700. Depicts 1673. Digital scan via NYPL Digital Gallery.

An early view looking up the Broad Canal from the harbor.

1673

Nieu Amsterdam, een stedeken in Noord Amerikaes Nieu Hollant
Schenk, Peter, Publisher. 1702. Depicts 1673. Digital scan via Fordham University Archives and Special Collections

This view is similar to Nieu Amsterdam at New Yorck, above, but with a different foreground.

1693

Plan de Manathes ou Nouvelle Yorc
Franquelin, J.B.L. Depicts 1693. Reproduced in Iconography of Manhattan by I.N. Phelps Stokes.

This map was perhaps made for military use by the French against the English. Major features are identifiable despite the "grid" layout the draftsman has assumed

1695

The Miller Plan
Miller, John. c.1695. Digital scan via DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln.

The Reverend John Miller, chaplain to English forces in New York from 1692-95, produced a complete description and map of the colony entitled New Yorke Considered and Improved A.D. 1695. This map was published with the book.

1696

The Shoemakers' Plan
Evetts, James, City Surveyor. 1696. Reproduced in Iconography of Manhattan by I.N. Phelps Stokes.

A city survey of a 17-acre field near Broadway and Maiden Lane. The property was owned by five shoemakers, who divided the plot into house lots.